picoPower Design Examples

 

The resources below highlight low-power design techniques applicable to Atmel® AVR® and Atmel® ǀ SMART ARM®-based microcontrollers, enabling you to save power without losing functionality.

 

Videos

The following videos below are examples of low-power techniques and design examples for specific microcontrollers. However, the theory and techniques can be applies to any Atmel AVR or Atmel | SMART ARM®-based microcontroller.




The Parrot

Power-saving and CPU relief with the AVR XMEGA® Event System and DMA. – Techniques applicable to most AVR and Atmel ǀ Smart microcontrollers.

Basic picoPower

General power-saving techniques for all Atmel AVR microcontrollers. - Most of the techniques shown work with any Atmel AVR microcontroller, but some require specific picoPower® features.

SleepWalking

The SleepWalking feature of the Atmel AVR UC3L explained in a simple but practical example.

Atmel ǀ SMART SAM4L: picoPower

The SAM4L sets a new standard for low power consumption for ARM® Cortex®-M4 devices. This video provides a brief overview of unique real world applications.

Atmel ǀ SMART SAM L21 Demo

Introducing the world's lowest power ARM Cortex-M0+ MCU with a unique ultra low-power design. This video will discuss key features of the SAM L21.

Microcontrollers and IoT

Explore the role of microcontrollers in the connected world of tomorrow. Atmel offers ultra low-power devices targeting the Internet of Things (IoT) market.

 

Application Notes and Code Examples

Below is a selection of Atmel application notes and code examples targeting low-power design for Atmel® AVR® and Atmel® ǀ SMART ARM®-based picoPower® microcontrollers.

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 Atmel AT09886: Getting Started with SAM L22 (13 pages, revision A, updated: 08/2015)
This document describes how to get started using the Atmel SAM L22 microcontrollers.
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 Atmel AT03975: Getting Started with SAM L21 (10 pages, revision A, updated: 02/2015)
This document describes how to get started using the Atmel SAM L21 microcontrollers.
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Atmel AT03976: SAM L21 OPAMP as ADC Gain Amplifier (13 pages, revision A, updated: 02/2015)
This application note introduces the Operational Amplifier Controller (OPAMP) module on SAM L21. An application example is presented, configuring the OPAMP as a gain amplifier internally connected to the ADC module for sampling.
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Atmel AT03289: SAM4L Low Power Design with FreeRTOS (13 pages, revision A, updated: 10/2013)
The purpose of this document is to introduce various low power modes of the SAM4L family and demonstrate how to do low power design with FreeRTOS tick suppression feature on SAM4L device.
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 Atmel AT07146: Low Power Design Consideration in Thermostat with SAM4L 12 pages, revision A, updated: 03/2014)
This application note describes the low power design considerations of Thermostat with Touch and Wireless Connectivity
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 Atmel AT06863: SAM4L Peripheral Event Controller (PEVC) (25 pages, revision A, updated: 05/2014)
This application note describes how to use the ASF driver for interfacing to the Peripheral Event Controller for SAM.
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Atmel AT04113: How to implement SleepWalking on an ARM Cortex-M4 MCU Application: Step-by-step Project Building Guide (69 pages, revision B, updated: 06/2014)
The aim of this document is to provide a step by step guide on how to implement SleepWalking on an Atmel ARM Cortex-M4 MCU, from the SAM4L product family.
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 Atmel AVR3005: Low Power QTouch Design (18 pages, revision A, updated: 12/2012)
This application note discusses on factors that account for power consumption and provides guidelines to reach lowest possible power consumption in Atmel® QTouch® designs without compromising touch functionality and performance.
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AVR32917: Getting started with the picoPower Board (16 pages, revision A, updated: 12/2009)
This application note describes the picoPower function of ATmega48PA, ATxmega32A4 and AT32UC3L064 and the picoPower Board which purpose is to get familiar with the general power-saving features of AVR microcontrollers.
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AVR4013: picoPower Basics(7 pages, revision A, updated 12/10)
This application note demonstrates how to extend the battery life of our application by multiple factors by modifying only the firmware. You will see that, while some of the modifications are very simple and only require setting some registers, other modifications will need some rewriting of the code.
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AVR1010: Minimizing the power consumption of XMEGA devices (13 pages, revision B, updated 11/09)
This application note describes what must be done to achieve the lowest possible power consumption for XMEGA devices. Example code is also supplied, which compiles with both GCC and IAR Embedded Workbench.
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AVR32739: Low power software design using 32-bit AVR UC3 (13 pages, revision B, updated 05/08)
This application note gives an overview of available features on the UC3 A and B series that help decrease power consumption. Most sections of this application note are also applicable for other 32-bit AVR devices.
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AVR1504: Xplain training - XMEGA Event System (15 pages, revision A, updated 8/10)
This Application Note will get you started with Atmel® AVR® XMEGA™ Event System which allows inter-peripheral communication, enabling a change of state in one peripheral to automatically trigger actions in other peripherals, without any use of interrupts or CPU and DMA resources.
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AVR1509: Xplain training - Low Power (12 pages, revision A, updated 8/10)
This Application Note will get you started with Atmel® AVR® XMEGA™ various sleep modes and software controlled clock gating which allow to tailor power consumption to the application's requirement.
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Atmel AVR1521: XMEGA-A1 Xplained Training - Low Power (12 pages, revision A, updated: 07/2011)
Atmel® AVR® XMEGA® provides various sleep modes and software controlled clock gating in order to tailor power consumption to the application's requirement. Sleep modes enables the microcontroller to shut down unused modules to save power. When the device enters sleep mode, program execution is stopped and interrupts or reset is used to wake the device again. The individual clock to unused peripherals can be stopped during normal operation or in sleep, enabling a much more fine tuned power management than sleep modes alone.
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AVR035: Efficient C Coding for 8-bit AVR microcontrollers (22 pages, revision D, updated 01/04)
This Application Note describes how to utilize the advantages of the 8-bit AVR architecture and the development tools to achieve more efficient c Code than for any other microcontroller.
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AVR1304: Using the XMEGA DMA Controller (10 pages, revision B, updated 7/09)
This application note describes the basic functionality of the XMEGA DMAC with code examples to get up and running quickly. A driver interface written in C is included as well.